BDAR

All the Lithuanian citizens may be vaccinated in Lithuania against Covid-19, regardless of their place or country of residence, as well as other persons, who:

  • are entitled to personal health care services paid from the Compulsory Health Insurance Fund or from the State budget;
  • citizens of the Member States of the European Union and the European Free Trade Association and their family members, who have come to live in Lithuania for the period exceeding 3 months in 6 months, and who have been granted the right to reside in Lithuania;
  • foreign citizens and persons without citizenship, to whom the Lithuanian residence permit has been issued;
  • persons, to whom the national visa has been issued;
  • persons accredited and residing in Lithuania;
  • other persons who have to be vaccinated by the Government’s resolution.
Last updated: 08 07 2021

Vaccination services in Lithuania can be obtained by foreigners who are permanent residents of Lithuania and/or who are insured by compulsory health insurance in Lithuania (who work and pay compulsory health insurance premiums or for whom contributions are paid, as well as by persons who are insured with state budget funds).

Insured persons from other EU countries who have moved to the Republic of Lithuania (having declared their place of residence in the Republic of Lithuania in accordance with the procedure laid down in the Law on Declaration of the place of residence) and who are registered with Document S1 in the territorial sickness fund according to the place of residence in Lithuania are entitled to the same personal health care services as well as those insured in the Republic of Lithuania with compulsory health insurance (hereinafter referred to as PSD), including vaccination

Last updated: 11 05 2021
  • Online registration is available from the Koronastop.lt website, logged in via the Electronic Government Gateway. You can opt for place and time for vaccination at your health facility.
  • If you do not have the option to register online, you should contact your health care provider for the vaccination.
Last updated: 19 10 2022

The booster vaccine is adapted to specifically target the Omicron variant of the COVID-19 pathogen. Adapted vaccines contain both the vaccine component that protects against the original virus variant and the component that protects against the relevant Omicron sub-variant. The vaccines available in Lithuania are adapted for BA.1 and BA.4 and BA.5 sub-variants. The vaccine for sub-variant BA.1 is slightly different from the vaccine adapted for sub-variant BA.4 and BA.5, but these virus variants are very similar, so there is no major difference between these adapted vaccines. All the approved adapted vaccines are suitable for vaccination of the population with a booster dose, and it is recommended that the population is vaccinated with Omicron vaccine. Vaccination with the first or second booster dose will be done with the adapted vaccine that will be available with the health provider at that time.

Last updated: 19 10 2022

The first booster dose can be administered in the population of 12 years and older provided they completed the primary series. Those aged 18 years and older can also receive a second booster dose. It is important to maintain the intervals between previous doses and/or recovery when vaccinating with booster doses.

Vaccination with the first COVID-19 variant-adapted booster vaccine dose (under complete vaccination series with Comirnaty, Spikevax, Vaxzevria or Janssen):

  • In the case of the recovery of COVID-19 disease (before, during or after vaccination) - 180 days (6 months) after the last vaccine or positive PCR test.
  • If you have not had COVID-19 - 90 days (3 months) after full vaccination.

Vaccination with the second COVID-19 variant-adapted booster vaccine dose:

Those with chronic immunocompromising diseases:

  • Those recovered of COVID-19 disease - at least 180 days after the recovery.
  • Those vaccinated against COVID-19 disease - at least 90 days after the booster dose.

Those with other chronic diseases:

  • Those recovered of COVID-19 disease - at least 180 days after the recovery.
  • Those vaccinated against COVID-19 disease - at least 180 days after the booster dose.

All others:

  • Those recovered of COVID-19 disease - at least 270 days after the recovery.
  • Those vaccinated against COVID-19 disease - at least 180 days after the booster dose.
Last updated: 19 10 2022

Those recovered of COVID-19 disease can get vaccinated under the primary series 150 days after the diagnosis of this disease. However, earlier vaccination is also possible if if the pre-vaccination antibody test is negative, i.e. no IgG antibodies are detected (at least 3 weeks must pass between the diagnosis of COVID-19 and the antibody test).

In the case where COVID-19 disease is diagnosed after the first dose of COVID-19 vaccine, a second dose can be administered at least 150 days after the confirmation of the diagnosis of COVID-19 disease, unless no antibodies have been found at least 21 days after the diagnosis.

The booster dose may be administered in the population of 12 years and older if they completed the full vaccination series and contracted COVID-19 disease (regardless of the sequence of vaccination and contraction) - at least 180 days of whichever comes at a later date - vaccination or contraction.

The second booster dose may be administered in those aged 18 years and older who have received the first booster dose - at least 180 days after the date of administration of the booster dose of COVID-19 vaccine or 270 days after the confirmation of the diagnosis of COVID-19 disease. Other intervals apply for persons with chronic immunocompromising diseases or otherwise vulnerable population.

Last updated: 19 10 2022

The primary vaccination series is open to those aged 5 years and older.

The first booster dose is available to those aged 12 years and older, and the second booster dose is available to the ones aged 18 years and older. Vaccination is done with adapted vaccines.

Last updated: 19 10 2022

COVID-19 vaccines are drugs designed to prevent deaths and hospitalisations caused by COVID-19 through triggered immune response.

The current COVID-19 pandemic is a global crisis with enormous negative impact on human health, social and economic life.

COVID-19 has the potential to cause severe illness with long-term consequences for people of all ages. Some cases can be fatal.

To protect public health, save lives, protect the health system from being overloaded, and protect health professionals and vulnerable groups such as the elderly or those with chronic diseases, the most effective measure is the use of safe and effective vaccines against COVID-19.

Last updated: 19 10 2022

It can be done on the same day or during the same visit to the doctor's. You can get vaccinated against COVID-19 and against other infectious diseases such as tick-borne encephalitis, seasonal influenza, pneumococcal infection and others at the same time. In this case, it is recommended that the injections are administered in different spots on the body.

Last updated: 19 10 2022

In the case of the primary vaccination series, a patient selects during the registration an original vaccine he/she wishes to be vaccinated with.

In the case of booster vaccination, adapted vaccine is administered automatically.

Last updated: 19 10 2022

The results of observational studies confirm that vaccines authorised in the EU and EEA protect against severe forms of COVID-19-related disease, hospitalisation and death, and therefore vaccination continues to play an important role in preventing severe clinical outcomes. However, protection tends to weaken over time. To ensure greater and longer-lasting protection, it is important to vaccinate with a booster dose of COVID-19 vaccine after the primary vaccination, especially in persons at risk.

Last updated: 19 10 2022

Both the vaccine and the vaccination service itself are free. The vaccination against COVID-19 in Lithuania is available to all citizens of the country, regardless of their place or country of residence, as well as to others:

  • who are entitled to personal healthcare services covered from the budget of the Compulsory Health Insurance Fund or the state budget;
  • citizens of the Member States of the European Union or the European Free Trade Association and their family members who have come to Lithuania for more than 3 months in a six-month period and have acquired the right to reside in Lithuania;
  • citizens of foreign countries and stateless persons who have been issued a permit to reside in Lithuania;
  • those holding a national visa;
  • those accredited and residing in Lithuania;
  • others required to be vaccinated by the decision of the Government

However, if a person who is not covered by compulsory health insurance in Lithuania wishes to get vaccination, they may have to pay for the vaccination service, but the COVID-19 vaccine itself will be free.

Last updated: 19 10 2022

Yes, all the Lithuanian citizens may be vaccinated in Lithuania, regardless of their country of residence.

Last updated: 08 07 2021

Keep a personal document on you while you are going to vaccinate.

Last updated: 14 10 2022

A person who is sick, has a fever or in the acute period of any disease is not vaccinated.

Last updated: 08 07 2021

Side effects are a sign that the immune system reacts to the vaccine and starts producing antibodies that can overcome the virus and prevent it from multiplying, so vaccination allows to avoid the disease or a person suffers from a weaker form of the disease.

Last updated: 08 07 2021

Fatigue, pain and swelling at the injection area, headache, muscle and joint pain, chills, fever Normally, they pass after a few days.

Last updated: 08 07 2021

Please inform your family doctor and/or the State Medicines Control Agency of suspected adverse reactions to the vaccine.

Last updated: 08 07 2021

Yes, you should contact your family doctor for incapacity.

Last updated: 08 07 2021

Yes, this is your right. Vaccination is not mandatory.

Last updated: 08 07 2021

Viruses usually mutate (the genetic material of the virus changes), but mutations do not necessarily affect the effectiveness of the vaccine against the virus.

Some vaccines against viral diseases remain effective many years after their creation and provide long-term protection.

On the other hand, with diseases such as influenza, the strains of the virus change so often and so much that the composition of the vaccine needs to be updated annually in order to make it effective.

The efficacy of Covid 19 vaccines is under continuous monitoring, which is very important in detecting any reduction in protection or decreasing efficacy against the circulating variants. Since the evidence in this field is constantly evolving, vaccine recommendations or vaccination strategies are adjusted accordingly.

Last updated: 19 10 2022
Last updated: 02 05 2022